No constitutional right to be ladies thesis


no constitutional right to be ladies thesis

: Women and Obligations of Citizenship. It was adopted even by those who, like the Christian socialist Richard. While starting with a common-law doctrine that is centuries old, Kerber gives us a book that is of necessity a history of contemporary American civic law and institutions. The author is too good a storyteller, however, to lay this all out without drama. But the Massachusetts court held for her son when he claimed that she had not forfeited her property and he could therefore inherit. Kerber places each case in its era's social and political history, with a wealth of detail drawn from archival sources and contemporary literature and ample support from modern secondary sources. 309) for women to collect. But, Kerber argues, the legal structure that was used to compel black women to work in public was also used to restrict white women to a cloistered domesticity that simulated idleness. Since 1787 the answer has been yes, but not on the same terms upon which a man holds his citizenship. But the right of American women to sit as jurors and share in the exercise of the power of the jury is a late twentieth-century attainment.

No constitutional right to be ladies thesis
no constitutional right to be ladies thesis

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Also, I cannot agree with Kerber's reading of top book review sites Judge Cooley's treatise. Here women appear to have had the advantage. One of the most interesting contributions this book makes is in the identification of numerous lawyers who from 1801 (James Sullivan of Massachusetts) through the current era (former Deputy Attorney General for Civil Rights Isabelle Pinzler) have contributed to the formulation of theories of women's. The wife's person, property, and labor became subject to the ownership and control of her husband and, for the duration of the marriage, she lost the legal capacity to enter into contracts, own and manage property, sue or be sued in her own name, choose. The chapter is built around a vivid retelling of the tax resistance of two spinsters, the redoubtable Smith sisters of Glastonbury, Connecticut, in the 1870s and 1880s and builds on the earlier work of tax historian Carolyn Jones.

Kerber insightfully brings the historian's questions to this subject, focusing as much on the stories of the lawyers and the litigants as on legal theory. 19.95 (paper isbn ;.00 (cloth isbn.


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